A Journey In Black and Indian Love

A Peek inside the marriage of an African American woman and her East Indian spouse

Standing in God’s Grace August 4, 2009

I’ve always considered myself to be a spiritual person and in the last week I’ve experienced God’s presence in major ways that I had not before. As I mentioned in a previous blog post, I was going to Gatlinburg to celebrate my 35th birthday with friends and family. The plan was to zipline, go whitewater rafting and enjoy the presence of my friends. For the most part, the plan was followed but we opted not to go ziplining for several reasons, the main one  being the fact that I almost drowned after being pitched out of a raft on a class IV rapid. Let me explain.

Off I trekked with two of my friend and their families along with my family to the beautiful Smokies that you see above. My family and I enjoyed a day of tubing on Friday and on Saturday we went rafting with USA rafting. I had confirmed that there was only going to be class two and three rapids because I was taking my twins and I wanted something that would be safe. So off we go on the lower Pigeon River with my friend Sibbreena. I should digress for a moment and tell you that Sibbreena only went because I wanted her to go. She kept telling me how she was only going because it was my birthday. White water rafting was never something on top of her to do list but she said she wasn’t going to go on this trip and not do something crazy with me.  Throughout the safety talk she would ocassionally glance back at me and buck her eyes as if to say ‘are you all nuts?’ 

We finally got to our rafting spot and our guide, Travis, gave us the instructions we needed to navigate through our first few rapids. They were a piece of cake but I noticed the water began to have a lot more force behind it as we got further down the river. Sibbreena and I were at the front of the raft and were setting paddle pace. My twins were directly behind me and M was at the very back acting as motor man while Travis guided us.

Travis told us we were about to approach a class four rapid named the “Lost Guide” Supposedly the rapid got its name because guides would sometimes fall out.  We all laughed and told him we were not going to lose him.  I then asked about the class four rapid and mentioned how we were told there were only class two and three. Travis said it was the only four and we would be fine.  When we got to the rapid all I saw was what looked like a waterfall with the water flowing upside down. That’s the last thing I remember after seeing Sibbreena pop out of the raft like Jiffy Pop next to me  until  my faculties came back to me as I realized that I was choking on a mouthful of salty briney river water. The force of the water had pitched me out of the raft too. I looked up to see Sibbreena to the left of me and I began to scream for her to grab my hand.  Another current then drug me back under and when I came back up I was completely panicked. A thousand thoughts ran through my head, including the fact that I had lost a shoe, and to flip on my back the way they said to do in the safety instruction. When  I flipped on my back I  saw two things that made me completely freak out 1) I saw one of my children being plucked from the river. 2) I realized my raft was exremely far away and that the nearest raft to the left of us was quite far off.  When I realized this, another current pulled me back under and it was then that the thought occurred to me that I was going to die on my birthday with my children watching.

Another thing they taught us in the safety class was to hold our paddle up in the air and shout paddle so that if a raft was near they could pull us in by the t-bar.  I realized while underwater for the third time that I still had my paddle in my hand. I popped up out of the water and yelled paddle only to realize the rafts seemed to get farther away than closer. I’ve never felt so defeated before. I began to cry and scream for someone to please help me.  The current originally seemed to be taking us toward the banks of the river and I kept thinking that if we got close enough that we would be able to grab onto a branch.  As soon as I thought this was my way out, the current changed and began to shift us back to the center of the river. I finally heard one of the raft guides yell out “Swimmer!” But I saw no one jump in..(I figured out later we were the “swimmers” only we weren’t swimming at all.. we were being drug by the currents), he then yelled out “Rope!” They had told us in safety training that As soon as I saw the rope being thrown at Sibbreena who was to the left of me, I realized it was going to fall short. Thank God Sibbreena had the thought to take her oar and grab the rope with it.  That’s how they were finally able to fish us in. Needless to say when the rescue raft pulled us in I was in tears and shaking like a leaf on a tree on a windy day.  I thanked God for having protected me and my family. 

About the time we began to settle our nerves we were transferred back to our own raft where Travis told us we had to resume our positions. I wish you could have seen the looks on me and Sibbreena’s faces. I turned to Travis and said “You want us to do what?! You’ve got to be kidding me” But he wasn’t. Sibbreena and I silently resumed our positions  and the next rapid we hit was a class III. It was harrowing and I prayed aloud the whole time. Sibbreena told me later she hadn’t heard anyone praying so hard and loudly before. What she didn’t realize until much later was how the experience had shaken me in a way that words can’t explain. Later when we talked about what happened, she told me it was life changing for her as well but that she didn’t regret doing it.

Two more weird things about the experience.. when we got in the raft, Travis handed me both of my shoes that had been in the river..my first thought was “what the hell?! you found time to fish my shoes out of the river but not me?!”  The second weird thing is that the sunglasses I had on my face were STILL on there even after having been drug undercurrent three times. I think it was the straps on the helmet that kept them on. Either way I was surprised.

Since having that rafting experience I’ve not slept without being back in the water. It disturbed me so much that I’m constantly reliving the moments several times a day. It’s not healthy and I realize that despite how crazy others may think I am, my goal is to conquer that rafting route without falling out. It won’t be soon but it will happen one day. I know that if I don’t do it, I’ll have always let that moment define me in negative ways.  I am thankful that my family and friend are safe. Prayer does change things.

Three days after the rafting trip, I had surgery. I had already told the doctor’s I have had my near death experience for my life so they needed to be on point. I was in recovery and had been awakened and M had been brought around when I began to have severe chest pains and problems breathing. I was immediately whisked to the urgent care area where they tore my gown off, hooked me up to some electrodes and began to pump medication in me. I don’t remember a whole lot other than My surgeon suddenly appeared he began to use a fist to rub around in my chest. Another doctor (the anesthesiologist I think) was yelling out medication orders. I soon got physically sick and began to throw up. Well as you know there was nothing to throw up digestive juices which the doctors and nurses said was full of air bubbles. They seem to think the problem was from air being trapped in my chest wall. Before long I began to feel better but they kept me longer as a precaution. Again, I feel I was standing in God’s grace.

M doesn’t understand how these experiences have shaped my thought process about things and how scared I felt and still feel. He said our raft guide was very concerned about us hitting some of the many rocks in the river but that he felt assured we would be rescued with no problem because we had on our life jackets and there were many rafts in the area.  He said they immediately got my son out of the water as soon as he hit it. But what disturbs me is that I don’t recall M even asking if I was okay. Of course he said he did but I don’t remember that.

M’s sister told me the other day that he has always been an internalizer-even as a kid he would never talk to anyone and would brush things off.  I understand his nature but times like this it doesn’t work for me. I need him to understand the seriousness of all of this and how it has really screwed with my head. I’m a bit too close to death these days and I don’t like it.

Everyone keep me in my prayers. I’m sure I’ll be okay but it’s only been a week so I still have some things to sort out. Enjoy the pics from the trip.. Until the next blog my lovelies…

 

Long Time No See June 1, 2009

I can’t believe it has been so long since I’ve had the opportunity to write on the blog. I appreciate all of the comments and the outreach from people who like the blog.

This past Memorial day, M and the kids and I went camping with several other members of my family. Overall, the weekend was okay except for one major glitch. My youngest aunt called M, Osama as he was walking out of the RV thinking it would be a cute joke.  Thankfully, M said he never heard her. However, other family members did and laughed. I immediately put her in check and told her the remark was extremely tacky. I also asked her how she would feel if someone from his family called her a derogatory name.  She didn’t say anything but I got my point across very very clearly to her and the family members who laughed. I am thankful that M has such a cool personality. He takes everything in stride and never holds a grudge.  I did notice that M and my mother had more camaraderie. Thankfully, despite the sporadic ignorance on the part of my family, he said he had a good time.

In more happy news, we booked our family vacation to Walt Disney later in the year. It’s going to be a busy year of travel because we just recently signed for some commercial property for our business and we have to take a trip to China and we’re thinking of combining it with the one to India. I think the kids are more excited about Disney than anything else. Here’s a tip for all of you who have been thinking about going to Disney some day.. Now is the time! Disney has some unbelievable package deals right now.

I don’t know if I mentioned this before but M is by trade a mechanical engineer with a concentration in automobiles. He was working as a process engineer when he was laid off a few months ago. Thank God we were preparing for something of this nature. It’s been months now and M complains daily about how nothing is panning out for him because of this economy.  Thankfully, we were preparing for something of this nature. We’re hoping the opening of a brick and mortar wholesale business will be successful. In the meantime, I try to keep M’s spirits up. Not having a job is emasculating for him and I try to make sure he knows that I understand and I don’t hold anything against him. As far as me and my kids are concerned, he is still the head of this household. That being said, M now feels that because he’s not working he cannot take part of major money decisions. We have to go back and forth three or four times before he will finally make a decision on an issue related to money. It’s frustrating.  I want him to remember that no matter what happens, he’s still the husband and father. That doesn’t change because of job status.

We live in an area that isn’t as open to racial diversity as it claims to be. I think being Indian is making M’s job search a little more difficult. The way I see it, is that those people who won’t hire him because of how he sounds or because he’s from a different culture are the ones missing out and if someone doesn’t want you for asinine reasons, it’s not the place for you anyway. I’d much rather work in an environment where people respect differences.

Sorry it took so long to post a new blog… more to come so until the next blog…

Blindian

 

Finally!! A guest post from Hubby May 17, 2009

 

After threats to withhold his favorite wings and fries, a few emotional blackmail attempts and a few stares, I finally got hubby to write a guest post. What follows is what my act of convincing produced.  It’s his random thought process about interracial marriages:

Inter-racial marriage/Dating………
Why is there a big talk about inter-racial marriage and Indians?Does anyone really know what type of racial divide we have in India? It’s not the color of your skin. It’s the religion and the caste.Now you might think it is only in hindu community that caste and religion matter so much but .it is not. It is wide in the Christian and the muslim community too.
You can be dark skinned and still be from the higher caste. You can be fair and be from the lower community. End of the day, it is your religion and caste and you are expected to stand by it. Now in India you’d even face problems when you generally date or marry for the same religion but a different caste.
 Marriage in the Indian community is essentially between families not just the two people. Marriages are generally arranged. Even when it is a love marriage within the same religion its still mostly arranged.  Family elders meet and get to know of one another and then proceed.  Now normally anyone would say it is a love marriage but unfortunately it is  still arranged.
Now about dowry.  Does anyone know really what that means.It is life time maintenance money to the husband to look after their daughter.
Fortunately I was born into a progressive thinking family who did think marriage is between 2 people not the family.  Basically I never had problems with my decision. I belong to a higher caste and I am proud of it. But i was never taught in my home that there are two types of segregation in human society. I had friends from all strata of the society. I am a Hindu who eats beef,–but that does not mean my family eats it. I was schooled in a catholic convent. I am happy with whom I am married to.
I dont think marrying from another culture like me would be a norm with all the Indians you all come across.Every area in India has their own do’s and dont’s. If you know what to look for then maybe you can find someone to treasure. It’s actually a complicated situation.
As far as someone who wants to go ahead with this sort of releationship, let me tell you that there are some areas and communities that are more tolerant and understanding than some others. Best of luck for all who’s still searching.
  
 

A Fresh Blog Post. Hot Off the Presses. May 3, 2009

I’m finally back with a fresh blog post. The week has been very very busy and I had not found the time to write. Hubby has been promising to guest write for me but so far that hasn’t happened. Every time I ask him about it, he says he’s still thinking about what he is going to write about. Let’s all collectively roll eyes on that.

After three years of trying to get M realize that not everyone in any one race is the same, twice this week when I was telling him about a negative situation that happened (one involving a check from a customer for our business), he automatically asked “was it a black person?”  His question gave me pause and made me ask him why he automatically assumed it was a black person that was involved in something negative. He didn’t have an answer for me, other than to say “I was just curious.”

Now mind you, M and I have had many discussions about why crime rates may be higher in some areas than others or why there are so many black on black murders etc. We’ve talked about the socioeconomic connections and educational factors that contribute to downtrodden. But somehow, I don’t think he’s grasped it all. Even now after all of this time being here in the states, he hasn’t connected with many other blacks apart from my family (or Indians either for that matter…come to think about it.. he hasn’t connected with anyone).  He needs to be able to experience people of all races from all walks of life so that he can see that there’s not just one type of person in any ethnic group. I really want him to get to a point where he recognizes that crime has no face and no racial group is immune from being the victim of a crime or committing one.

Shifting the topic to one more positive, on Friday the kids had their Spring Fling. I was so excited because I saw more mixed couples there than I had seen in the entire city we live in. Other than M and myself, there were at least four other couples I saw that night and they were all openly engaged with one another and small amounts of PDA.  It shows the grand old south where we live is changing its guard a bit. I like that.

Okay guys, I’m going to keep this one short. I’m a bit under the weather and my bed is calling me for a nap. Until the next blog. …

 

Oh by the way.. some comments I haven’t yet gotten a chance to respond to  yet but I will later this evening.

 

The Real Reason Some People Are Against Interracial Relationships April 22, 2009

I recently made a post titled “Can’t We All Just Get Along?” The post got the attention of Tom, a white male married to an Asian woman. I was excited because Tom was not only my first male poster, but he also brought a fresh perspective to IR’s.

Today Tom made this comment “I know the people who say stick to your own kind are probably only stating it because they feel it will protect you from being hurt or rejected.”
 
Or… they say “stick to your own kind” because that is what they have always done; the reason being that they, themselves, are either too frightened or small-minded to venture out into the wider world.
 
People often subconsciously transfer their own fears and stigma onto others.”
 
 (the rest of his comment can be read in the original blog ).

When I read Tom’s words, it was like a light bulb went on. He worded my thoughts so accurately. Tom is very correct about how people subconsciously transfer their own fears and stigma onto others and how fear keeps people from venturing out. It’s like a social mania.

 Unfortunately, society has screwed so many of us up. We seek validation and approval from others without realizing how detrimental it can be to us. It’s like we’re puppets in a puppet show being run by the man behind the curtain. How many times have we done something in our lives, not because we wanted to but because we didn’t want to face the retribution or harsh reaction from others if we went against the norm?  This is why some people react so harshly to intercultural and interracial relationships.  It goes against what others have told them should happen and THAT makes them uncomfortable.

Black women have so much baggage laid upon us about dating outside the race. The way some people act, you would think we were committing cultural genocide. I honestly think that some Indians feel the same way…that their sons or daughters being involved with someone of a different religion, caste or creed somehow dilutes their heritage.  They don’t look at it as a new dimension or facet being added.

M and I are thinking about having a baby. We talk about it at least twice a week. M has no blood children and I am thankful he loves my twins as his own. I hesitate to have another child because 1) my twins are 8 now and going back to having an infant I feel would be difficult 2) my twins are a result of fertility drug treatments and even though they have been great kids, I am fearful of having another set of twins and 3) we travel a great deal and traveling with an infant is a whole new ballgame. I know these are probably selfish issues but I brought this subject up to say this.  If we do decide to have a child, we know we will raise it to embrace both sides of their culture. There’s no one culture superior to the other (contrary to many twisted beliefs).

Tom’s comment made me realize that some people hide their racism behind the cloak of “love.” But if they really loved you, it wouldn’t matter who you were with and why as long as you are happy and treated with respect.  Until the next blog…

 

The India Experience Part II April 7, 2009

 

 
 

I recently got a request for more information about my experience living in India. So for Sue-Ellen and Nathan, I hope the following blog helps with your upcoming trip.

India is a land of glorious contrasts. It’s a beautiful country with mountains and rugged terrain and in the southern part of the country the areas that border the sea are unspeakably gorgeous. There’s nothing like a day in Goa sitting underneath a palm tree, listening to waves crash against the shoreline.  

The vibrant colors of the saris, salwar Kameez’s and lenghas worn by the women of India burst loudly against a backdrop of often drab and dusty streets.  It’s spiritual, yet it’s that spirituality that has the ability to spark violent outbursts when two opposing views can’t meet in the middle. We’ve driven through religious protests in Kerala that were scary to say the least. It’s a country where there are extreme examples of poverty and shameless touting of wealth. Often these two worlds collide when one has to rely on the other for service.

For me, one of the hardest parts of being in India was the swings between the extremes. On the way from the New Delhi airport, you see hotels like the Radisson with all of its opulence surrounded on either side by people so poor that their homes are nothing more than lean-to’s with tarp or twig roofs.  I know that India is still considered to be a third world country and I knew not to expect the same things I saw or had at home. However, nothing could prepare me for seeing poverty at its worst.  That being said, even with its poverty, I saw something in India as a nation that I don’t see nearly as often here-the will and the desire to persist even in the extremist of situations. The people of India work their butts off every day. Many times they are doing the jobs you or I may turn our noses up at or flatly refuse to do. But Indians know they have responsibilities to their families and will do everything possible to handle what they need to. You see this in the roadside barbers, dentists, vegetable sellers and others. Mostly everyone has a hustle or gig to help them meet the very basic of their needs.

When we moved into our flat in South Delhi, we weren’t there 20 minutes before woman after woman was ringing our doorbell to see if we needed a housekeeper. This is the spirit of India that has helped the country survive for so long- the spirit that always finds a way to survive even in blighted situations.

For those traveling to India, my number one suggestion is to prepare yourself for the unexpected. In honor of this suggestion, I’ve made a list of things you shouldn’t be surprised to see in daily life.

1 ) Poverty– Kids, the elderly and disabled commonly beg for money. I saw this more in the larger cities up North than in the southern part of the country .

2) Unusual professions– Barbers, Dentistry is sometimes practiced roadside (yes dentistry). While we may find this to  be odd, you have to remember that not everyone can afford a dentist with a traditional office so the roadside dentists can fill an important gap in healthcare for the extremely poor.

3) Fast Food Delivery and unusual menu items– McDonalds, KFC, and lots of other places that we have here actually deliver there in India. One of my favorite fast food restaurants in Delhi is Yo China. They have some of the best honey potatoes and crispy chicken wings around.  Remember beef isn’t served there (at least not in Northern India. I have been able to get beef in Southern India). So in the place of traditional hamburgers, you’ll find things like lamb burgers.

4) Cows and monkeys everywhere. Remember cows are sacred in Hinduism so you will see them often roaming the streets, eating out of garbage and sometimes causing traffic jams for hours. Monkeys are just an annoyance.

5) Public releasing of bodily functions. I’ve seen more men peeing on the side of the street than I care to even think about. It’s something that is common. There are no roadside restrooms or convenience stores like we have here so the guys just whip it out and go. I’ve even seen pooing on the street but that’s only been twice thankfully.  I have noticed that there are signs that warn against public urination so clearly people know there’s a problem with this.

6) HORNS HORNS EVERYWHERE.  In larger cities like Delhi and Mumbai horns are used like air being breathed in. People are constantly blowing their horns as a warning to someone or a ‘get out of the way.’  Again, it’s such a problem that there are signs up prohibiting horn blowing but I’ve always noticed that even in those areas, people still beep their horns.

7) Meat hanging out on the open. One of the most disturbing things to me as a person was to see meat or other food hanging in the open uncovered. In a city like Delhi where flies rival the number of people, I couldn’t help but think of the germs, etc. The very first time I went to IME market was in the winter so seeing fish etc out in the open wasn’t a huge deal. But when I went back in the spring when the weather was warmer, the flies were covering practically everything.  If thing like this bother you, avoid going to markets.

8) People and peddlers. There are tons of people in India so at any given time night or day you are likely to see people.  For some people it’s surprising to see the number of people on a road at any given time but it shouldn’t be. Just as we live day to day and have somewhere to go, so do these people. As for the peddlers, they are common in larger cities like Delhi. I’ve had people try to sale me everything from toilet paper to flowers, to spinning pens while sitting in traffic. This is their way of making a living so don’t be surprised if you are approached. If you don’t want anything say no (pronounced Nay in Hindi).

9) Not every place in India has a Western style toilet. Be prepared for this- especially women. It can be a little awkward if you are not accustomed to squatting. I had an experience in Goa with a place where I was wearing a really long ankle length skirt that I had difficulty holding up to where part of it wouldn’t fall into the sandas. Let’s just say I wound up completely undressing from the waist down in order to be able to urinate properly (TMI I know.. lol)

10) Shopping. In most markets you will be able to negotiate price. Often, the shop keeper will start with something absolutely ludicrous and you will have to negotiate the price down to what is standard. Here’s a little forewarning. The moment they find you are western, your price goes up. I found in the beginning that if I saw something I wanted I would let Manoj negotiate for me. I would whisper or speak low to Manoj to convey my wishes. Only after the price was confirmed would I openly say something because my accent would give me away as being a westerner. Unfortunately some people see “walking sucker” stamped on your forehead if you are western. It’s only been here in the last couple of visits that I’ve done my own negotiations. I’ve found once they hear me speak a bit of Hindi, they don’t try to screw me as much on the price. M only intervenes if the shop keeper is being too aggressive or he sees me getting frustrated.

11) Weather – If you can, avoid going to India during the summer unless you can stand extreme heat. Notice the word EXTREME. It’s not a dry desert heat. You get monsoon rains at the same time and that pushes the humidity level up. Sometimes the heat and humidity are so high, it’s hard to breath. I’ve found that February and Sept-November are my favorite times to visit because the weather is much more pleasant.

I do have a tip concerning clothing when you visit. For men, you won’t see men in shorts too often so keep this in mind. Women, please please please leave the short skirts, spaghetti strapped shirts and shorts at home. This is considered to be disrespectful and will only get you stares and whispers.  Also keep in mind that cities such as Delhi, Mumbai and Goa are a bit more lenient when it comes to attire but often the villages and other smaller cities are more conservative.  In Delhi I often wore Western style clothes (crop pants and short sleeved shirts) and had no problems. In Kerala and other places I wore things similar to salwars or ¾ length sleeves. All I’m saying is to be sensible and respect the area you are in.

I think that’s about it for my tips. If I’ve missed any, feel free to add your own. One thing I do encourage everyone to remember is that YOU are the visitor in their country, not the other way around. Don’t expect them to speak English or carry your type of currency or have the same type of cultural mannerisms you are accustomed to.

 Unfortunately, I often see people from other countries come in to other countries and try to act like they are at home. You have to remember that things which may be different or odd for you are not necessarily so for the people of the country you are visiting. For them, this is their way of life so please respect it. Remember, visiting India is about accepting all the country and its people have to offer. There are jerks in every country on the globe so if you run into one in India who you feel may treat you differently because of your skin tone or accent or whatever, take it with a grain of salt and move on. Consider it their loss not yours.  Until the next blog….

 

 

Religion-How Can Something So Good Sometimes Turn So Bad? April 6, 2009

A couple of days ago I got an email from a friend who’s been involved with an Indian guy for a number of years. To keep the story short and any identifying aspects of her out of the blog, religion and race are tearing them apart.  Her guy is Muslim and his family is refusing to sign the paperwork to allow them to marry because she’s non Indian. To read her email broke my heart. I could only imagine the pain she felt after having put so many years into building a love she thought would sustain through time.

Her situation sadly is not unique. Not just because of the race issue but because of the religious difference as well. Even in India, marrying someone of another faith is often frowned upon. Religion is something so intensely personal yet so many of the world’s battles have been started when religions are not the same. How can something so spiritual designed to bring us peace, bring so much war and hatred?

I’ve seen people get involved with someone of another religion in the hopes they could change it. I know of someone now whose father is a pastor and the idea of her marrying a Hindu male isn’t sitting so well with him. Her hope is that once her guy gets here, he will embrace Christianity.

What we seem to forget sometimes is that the very same way that we chose our religion (whether it be by assimilation through having grown up in the religion all of our life or by embracing a new faith after studying its principles) other people have the same experience. In other words, how would you feel if someone suddenly told you that what you have been taught all of your life or what you have come to embrace is wrong and that you should replace it with something more along the lines of their own thinking?

When M and I met, I knew he was Hindu. I also knew he has grown up in an Italian boarding school where Catholicism was taught. He knew I was the granddaughter of a Methodist minister who grew up in a Church of God Church (long story but my grandmother wasn’t the typical preacher’s wife. She chose her own faith). He knew I went to church regularly and I consider myself to be strong in my faith.

I was fortunate. M embraced going to church with me. I never told him his religion was wrong. I simply told him that he could not serve two Gods. In other words, he could not in my opinion have a clean heart saying that he believed in the holy Trinity and still visit the temple and embrace that faith when he went home.  I never ask him to go to church. He chooses to go on his own. I feel this is important when you have two people of different faiths. He’s never asked me to attend temple or embrace the teachings of Hinduism. He tells me about the gods when I ask but there’s never been a push on either of our sides to convert the other.  

Being in an intercultural marriage comes with so many important discussions that should be had. Religion is one of them. To avoid the subject could mean serious issues between you and your mate later. What happens if one of you begins to have a stronger walk in their faith while the other appears to have no interest? Would you be okay with that?  If you plan on having children, what religion are the children expected to embrace?  How is your family going to react to having a non-believer of their faith in their family? In India there are some temples I could not step foot in even if I wanted to because they are for Hindus only.

At the end of the day, no one can make the choice as to whether or not you should enter into an interreligious relationship but you. Family pressure may be there but no one can take the walk in faith but you. Many a successful person has been raised in mixed relationships. Until the next blog…